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2 edition of Is learning-by-exporting important? found in the catalog.

Is learning-by-exporting important?

Sofronis Clerides

Is learning-by-exporting important?

micro-dynamic evidence from Colombia, Mexico and Morocco

by Sofronis Clerides

  • 311 Want to read
  • 9 Currently reading

Published by National Bureau of Economic Research in Cambridge, MA .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Export marketing -- Columbia -- Econometric models.,
  • Export marketing -- Mexico -- Econometric models.,
  • Export marketing -- Morocco -- Econometric models.,
  • Industrial productivity -- Developing countries.

  • Edition Notes

    StatementSofronis Clerides, Saul Lach, James Tybout.
    SeriesNBER working paper series -- working paper 5715, Working paper series (National Bureau of Economic Research) -- working paper no. 5715.
    ContributionsLach, Saul., Tybout, James R., 1953-, National Bureau of Economic Research.
    The Physical Object
    Pagination57 p. :
    Number of Pages57
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL22412166M

    We find that relatively efficient firms become exporters, but firms' unit costs are not affected by previous export market participation. So the well-known efficiency gap between exporters and non-exporters is due to self-selection of the more efficient firms into the export market, rather than learning by exporting. Characteristics we nd important to learning-by-exporting are: foreign ownership, intensive use of im-ported inputs, a skilled workforce and small rm size. Finally, rms that are new to exporting seem to experience particularly high produc-tivity gains but begin enjoying them before entering into the export.

    The empirical evidence on whether participation in export markets increases plantlevel productivity has been inconclusive so far. We explain this inconclusiveness by drawing on Arrow's () characterization of learning-by-doing, which suggests focusing on young plants and using measures of export experience rather than export participation. In this article, we analyse the learning-by-exporting (LBE) hypothesis in the Mozambican context. Due to the presence of the ‘Born-Global’ phenomenon among exporters, we address the endogeneity introduced by self-selection, combining a generalised Blinder–Oaxaca approach with results from traditional matching techniques. Our results show that very few manufacturing firms export, and that.

      In contrast to existing findings, this book presents evidence consistent with learning by exporting - albeit in dimensions not previously examined in the literature. Furthermore, the results suggest that exporting strategies influence innovative productivity in complex ways, with important implications for research in international business.   Learning by exporting may be especially powerful for SMEs in developing countries, where small producers have limited knowledge of frontier techniques and domestic markets lack this type of expertise. Atkin et al. () found strong evidence of the learning-by-exporting mechanism in their experiment with Egyptian rug manufacturers.


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Is learning-by-exporting important? by Sofronis Clerides Download PDF EPUB FB2

This paper studies how learning from neighboring firms affects new exporters' performance. We develop a statistical decision model in which a firm updates its prior belief about demand in a foreign market based on several factors, including the number of neighbors currently selling there, the level and heterogeneity of their export sales, and the firm's own prior knowledge about the Cited by: Learning-by-Exporting: /ch The term learning-by-exporting (LBE) appeared in literature nearly three decades ago as a consequence of observing the beneficial influence of exports on the growth of newly-industrialized Asian economies.

The concept of LBE assumes that engaging in exporting stimulates innovativeness, promotes advantageous organizational changes and Author: Ewa Mińska-Struzik. This paper studies the learning-by-exporting effect through which a firm increases its productivity by entering into the export market.

Using Chinese firm-level data, we show that economies of scale and the choice of production technology play an important role in bridging the gap between exporting and firm : Kazuhiko Yokota, Kyosuke Kurita, Shujiro Urata.

1. Introduction. International trade benefits the trading parties both in static terms through comparative advantage, and in dynamic terms through exposing countries to the knowledge stocks of their trading partners (Grossman and Helpman, a, Grossman and Helpman, b).In practical terms, this ‘learning by exporting’ effect may be important at both the country level and at the level Cited by: In this paper, we aim to analyse the learning by exporting hypothesis in the Mozambican context.

Due to the presence of the born-global phenomenon among exporters, we address the endogeneity introduced by self-selection by combining a generalized BO approach with results from traditional matching techniques. Our results show that very few manufacturing firms export and that export.

learning-by-doingor, more precisely, learning-by-exporting,and examine how this affects the productivity trajectories of exporters and plants that switch markets, relative to those of non-exporters. Because the framework we develop does not lend itself to closed-formsolutions, we discuss its implications heuristically and using simulations.

"Is "Learning-by-Exporting" Important. Micro-dynamic Evidence from Colombia, Mexico, and Morocco," Finance and Economics Discussion SeriesBoard of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.), revised 10 Dec Sofronis Clerides & Saul Lach & James Tybout, "Is "Learning-by-Exporting" Important.

Based on the theory of heterogeneous enterprise trade and enterprise micro-data, this paper investigates the influence of direct export and indirect export on enterprise productivity, and explains the knowledge spillovers of the hypothesis of “learning by exporting” from the perspective of the relationship between export and enterprise productivity.

Is Learning By Exporting Important. Micro-Dynamic Evidence From Colombia, Mexico, And Morocco Article (PDF Available) in Quarterly Journal of Economics (3). Downloadable (with restrictions). Utilizing a previously unexplored plant-product matched dataset in the Korean manufacturing sector, this paper examines the impact of exporting on firms’ productivity and the mechanism by which it operates.

We find strong evidence for the learning-by-exporting hypothesis. We also find that exporting induces plants to introduce new products and rationalize. Learning-by-exporting (LBE) leads to an increase in the productivity of an enterprise induced by the onset of exporting.

It's a post-foreign-market-entry effect that is a consequence of an. Learning-by-doing, learning-by-exporting, and productivity: evidence from Colombia (English) Abstract.

The empirical evidence on whether participation in export markets increases plant-level productivity has been inconclusive so far. The authors explain this inconclusiveness by drawing on Arrow's () characterization of learning-by-doing. / Direct Evidence on Learning by Exporting: Customers, Competitors and Technology Leadership.

Proceedings of the 56th Annual Meeting of the Academy of International Business: Local Contexts in Global Business. editor / Klaus Meyer ; Tunga Kiyak. East Lansing, MI: Academy of International Business, pp. 12 (Academy of International Business.

Abstract. In this article, we analyse the learning-by-exporting (LBE) hypothesis in the Mozambican context. Due to the presence of the ‘Born-Global’ phenomenon among exporters, we address the endogeneity introduced by self-selection, combining a generalised Blinder–Oaxaca approach with results from traditional matching techniques.

This paper aims to analyse the relation between exporting behaviour of the firms and productivity by testing for learning by exporting hypothesis in Turkish manufacturing industry.

Moreover, this study examines whether exporting and productivity relations change with respect to the orientation of industry in which the firm operates. We use the data on the largest industrial enterprises of. Interestingly, re-exports are associated with large productivity gains for firms in both countries, perhaps because its knowledge-intensive nature makes learning by exporting particularly important.

Figure 2. Average Productivity Gains Over the Three Years Period Following Export Entry. 'Learning by exporting' refers to productivity gains experienced by firms after they commence exporting. Such gains are argued to be due to access to new knowledge and resources.

This column explores some of the preconditions for learning-by-exporting effects, using data on the overseas activities and affiliations of Japanese firms. COVID Resources. Reliable information about the coronavirus (COVID) is available from the World Health Organization (current situation, international travel).Numerous and frequently-updated resource results are available from this ’s WebJunction has pulled together information and resources to assist library staff as they consider how to handle coronavirus.

‘Learning by exporting’ refers to productivity gains experienced by firms after they commence exporting. Such gains are argued to be due to access to new knowledge and resources.

This column explores some of the preconditions for learning-by-exporting effects, using data on the overseas activities and affiliations of Japanese firms. Firms that enter markets in which they don’t. "The empirical evidence on whether participation in export markets increases plant-level productivity has been inconclusive so far.

The authors explain this inconclusiveness by drawing on Arrow's () characterization of learning-by-doing, which suggests focusing on young plants and using measures of export experience rather than export participation. A Note on Detecting Learning by Exporting Jan De Loecker. NBER Working Paper No.

Issued in November NBER Program(s):International Trade and Investment Program, Productivity, Innovation, and Entrepreneurship Program Learning by exporting refers to the mechanism whereby firms improve their performance (productivity) after entering export markets.Is Learning by Exporting Important?

Micro-Dynamic Evidence from Colombia, Mexico, and Morocco. Sofronis Clerides, Saul Lach and James R. Tybout. The Quarterly Journal of Economics,vol.issue 3, Abstract: Do firms become more efficient after becoming exporters? Do exporters generate positive externalities for domestically oriented producers?This paper‟s focus on learning-by-exporting stems from the recognition that this is where the empirical evidences of existing studies are most mixed and, nevertheless, whether learning-by-exporting effect exists or not has an important implication on the formulation of appropriate “openness” policies.